Scientific Program

Conference Series Ltd invites all the participants across the globe to attend International Conference on Agri Biotech and Environmental Engineering San Antonio,Texas,USA.

Day 2 :

Keynote Forum

Hikmet Budak

Professor Montana State University, USA

Keynote: Next generation tools in agriculture and charting the future research plan

Time : 10:00-10:50

OMICS International Agri Engineering 2017 International Conference Keynote Speaker Hikmet Budak photo
Biography:

Hikmet Budak has received his PhD degree with a major in Plant Breeding and Genetics and with a minor in Biometry from the University of Nebraska-Lincoln, USA in 2002. He has worked as a Coordinator and led grass genetics and breeding program at the same university and then returned to Turkey in 2004. He has received the Turkish Young Scientist Award in Turkey and Achievement Award by WORLCOMP06, USA in 2016. He has then joined Montana State University, USA as Montana Plant Sciences Endowed Chair in 2016. He has published over 120 peer reviewed articles and 10 book chapters. His research interests include molecular mechanisms of abiotic/biotic stress in wheat and barley in addition to computational genome analysis and genomics.

Abstract:

World population is expected to be 9 billion people in 2050 and global food production will need to increase by 70% in order to meet the global demand. Simultaneously, we as plant scientists must work to cope with changes in climate fluctuation, droughts, infestation of insects and diseases. These are major threat to international food security. Meeting the global food demand and addressing these challenges require using and utilizing new tools and technologies. With the advent of Next generation technologies and emergence of OMICS techniques including transcriptomics, proteomics, metabolomics, ionomics and CRISPR-Cas tools have helped to identify and characterize the genes, proteins, metabolites and ions involved in drought signaling pathways including editing, deleting and replacing the genome. Together, all these efforts helped in understanding the complex traits such as yield, water deficit and drought tolerance mechanism. In this talk we will talk more about new tools for next generation agriculture for crop improvement.

Keynote Forum

Amir M H Ibrahim

Professor Texas A&M University, USA

Keynote: Current trends in genomics and phenomics in wheat breeding

Time : 11:10-12:00

OMICS International Agri Engineering 2017 International Conference Keynote Speaker Amir M H Ibrahim photo
Biography:

Amir M H Ibrahim is a Professor and the project leader of the Small Grains Breeding program at TAMU. He joined the faculty of the Soil and Crop Sciences Department at TAMU in 2007. He received his Ph.D. in plant breeding and genetics from CSU in 1998. Dr. Ibrahim is currently involved in international collaborative research in North and East Africa, Central America, Central Asia and East Europe. His current research interests include mapping of genes and quantitative trait loci (QTL) associated with biotic and abiotic stress tolerance, end-use quality characteristics, germplasm diversity and genetic distance, yield per se and synthetic wheat. Dr. Ibrahim is also the Chair of the advisory Committee of Texas A&M AgriLife AgriGenomics Laboratory. Dr. Ibrahim teaches a graduate level course in “Experimental Designs in Agriculture” and an undergraduate course in “Crop Stress Management”.

Abstract:

Wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) breeding is a combination of art and science necessary for the accumulation of genes for high grain yield and stability, superior end-use quality and tolerance to prevalent biotic and abiotic stresses. Wheat breeding is also a numbers’ enterprise requiring the development of hundreds of targeted crosses, derivation of thousands of lines from early segregation bulk populations, and the screening of tens of thousands of advanced lines across multiple locations and years. High throughput phenotyping, via unmanned aircraft and ground-based systems, in conjunction with high throughput genotyping of molecular markers for high value traits, has become indispensable for maximizing gain from selection and development and release of superior genotypes for consequent release and adoption by producers. This presentation highlights current trends in phenomics and genomics tools necessary for large wheat improvement programs seeking to maintain their cutting edge in developing and releasing of superior wheat cultivars.

  • Plant Sciences | Agriculture and Environment Food Engineering | Agriculture Protection and Food Security | Seeding, Tillage and Harvesting | Food & Nutrients | Crop Protection and Awareness | Climatology and Atmospheric Sciences
Speaker

Chair

Hikmet Budak

Montana State University

Session Introduction

Ming-Chang Wu

National Pingtung University of Science and Technology, Taiwan

Title: Comparison between different sesame oil production techniques for lignans

Time : 12:00-12:25

Speaker
Biography:

Ming Chang Wu has completed his PhD with major in food processing, food chemistry and food industry management. His major researches are on food processing, food chemistry and functional food. Currently, he is the Distinguished Professor of Department of Food Science, National Pingtung University of Science and Technology.

Abstract:

Lipid oxidation has been recognized as the major problem affecting the quality of edible oils. Sesame oil is known to be significantly resistant to oxidative rancidity. Different extracted methods are involved in sesame oil produced, such as microwave technology, infrared heating technology, look forward to getting better quality. Lignans was regarded as the major active compound in sesame by determination of HPLC. In this study, lignans from sesame oil by traditional processing and ethanol extraction methods were compared. Four groups of the ethanolic (30%, 50%, 70% and 95%) and traditional sesame oil (120℃, 150℃, 180℃ and 210℃) which were processed from roasting, extractive and squeezing treatment was used as the control group. Among all tested extraction methods, the sesame oil had the highest content of sesamin, sesamolin and sesamol by roasting temperature with 120℃, 30% ethanolic extraction and roasting temperature with 210℃, respectively, compared to the control group. The storage test results also showed that the sesame oil by roasting temperature with 210℃ and 30% ethanol extraction methods, which were possessed the higher antioxidant activity than other processing methods after eight weeks. Our work showed the development of an optimal extraction process by 30% ethanolic extraction, which presented excellent antioxidant activity, indicating that sesame seeds may further be utilized as a potential source of natural biological active compounds.

Speaker
Biography:

Ugur Cakilcioglu has completed his PhD from Firat University, Turkey. He has published more than 40 papers in reputed journals and serving as an Editorial Board Member of repute. He has worked in many international journals in order to follow the international innovations in the field of plants.

Abstract:

The aim this study was to identify some edible wild plants consumed and to determine their nitrate and nutritional value. Six edible wild plant species: Capsella bursa-pastoris (L.) Medik., Malva neglecta Wallr., Portulaca oleracea L., Rheum ribes L., Rosa canina L., Urtica dioica L. were collected using appropriate methods. Herbariums of these plants were prepared and the plants were nomenclatured. Although nitrate content of various plants found in Turkey have been analyzed in some previous literature studies, only a limited number of studies have addressed nitrate content of edible wild plants that are widely consumed. Nitrate content in the plants was detected on the basis of the diazo compound measurement using spectrophotometric method. Analyses made in the scope of the present study indicated that nitrate content of the dry plant matter varied from 478.17-921.05 mg/kg range and the nitrate content of the dry matter to be from 6.73%-14.74% range. Portulaca oleracea L. was found to have the highest nitrate content (6560.95 mg/kg), while Rheum ribes L. with the lowest nitrate content (43.42 mg/kg). In this study, plants were also analyzed for their medicinal uses. Mineral content was substantially higher in wild food plants than in cultivated vegetables.

  • Young Research Forum( YRF)

Session Introduction

Joaquin Guillermo Ramirez Gil

Universidad Nacional de Colombia, Colombia

Title: Design of electronic devices for the monitoring of climatic variables in avocado production fields in Colombia

Time : 12:50-13:15

Speaker
Biography:

Joaquin Guillermo Ramirez Gil is an Agricultural Engineer, completed Master’s in Agricultural Sciences and currently pursuing his PhD. He has published more than 14 articles in scientific journals.

 

Abstract:

Quantification of climatic variables such as precipitation and temperature and determination of their interactions inside the soil profile is very important in avocado systems as a tool for prompt and appropriate management of several aspects of crop production such as the avocado wilt complex (AWC). Commercial electronic devices are very expensive and present the disadvantage that are made and calibrated for different conditions and usually, most epidemiological models are not suitable for the Colombian conditions. The aim of this work was to design a low cost electronic device for the collection and transmission of climatic variables including moisture and temperature from inside of the soil profile. As a complement, a mobile application was designed based on a different mathematical model that allows having information in real time, which may be used as an early warning system for the AWC. This electronic device was calibrated for being used in the tropical lower montane humid forest (TLM-hf) and in the tropical lower montane very humid forest (TLM-vhf) life zones in Antioquia, Colombia (sensu Holdridge). Data obtained was correlated with data collected by climatic stations and the quantification within the soil profile of the moisture and temperature by standard methodologies of soil analysis. Besides, the early warning system designed was correlated with data taken in avocado fields associated with AWC. The low cost electronic device showed a correlation higher than 90% compared with data obtained from traditional climatic stations and standard methods of soil analysis. In addition, the early warning system achieved a prediction higher than 80% of the variables associated with AWC.