Scientific Program

Conference Series Ltd invites all the participants across the globe to attend International Conference on Agri Biotech and Environmental Engineering San Antonio,Texas,USA.

Day 1 :

Keynote Forum

Osei-Agyeman Yeboah

Professor and Director North Carolina Agricultural and Technical State University, USA

Keynote: The influence of climate change on the demand for ethanol

Time : 10:00-10:50

OMICS International Agri Engineering 2017 International Conference Keynote Speaker Osei-Agyeman Yeboah photo
Biography:

Osei-Agyeman Yeboah is a member of the NC A&T faculty for the past 13 years. His scientific interests began at the Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology in his native Ghana, where he earned an Undergraduate degree in Agricultural Science. After working as an Assistant Agricultural Economist In charge of Agricultural Statistics from 1987 to 1991 in the Ministry of Food and Agriculture, Ghana, he came to NCA&T to earn a Master’s degree in Production Economics in 1993 and a Doctorate in Agricultural Economics (Resource Economics/International Agricultural Trade) at University of Nebraska-Lincoln in 1998. He served as a Post-doctoral Research Fellow at University of Nebraska-Lincoln USA EPA funded grant project from 1998 to 2000. In January 2001, he became Visiting Scholar teaching MS and PhD courses in resource economics at Auburn University, Alabama. He was also an adjunct faculty at the Auburn University Environmental Institute. In September 2003, he returned to North Carolina Agricultural and Technical State University in the Department of Agribusiness & Applied Economics as an Assistant Professor in international trade, international marketing, and agribusiness marketing. In April 2004, he became the Interim Director of the North Carolina A&T International Trade Center and was promoted to Associate Professor in 2009; Professor in 2014; and Professor and Director in 2016. He received Gamma Sigma Delta award of Excellence in Research in 2008; and the University’s Senior Excellence in Research Award in 2013. He is a recipient of many grants and awards from agencies such as USDA and USIAD. Most recently, including evaluation of alternative storage technologies for maize in Ghana; and strengthening the peanut value chain in Ghana, all USDA-FAS funded projects. He is a member of the American Agricultural Economics Association.

Abstract:

The causal link from emissions due to combustion fossil fuels to deliver energy services to climate change is well established. Climate change is expected to affect energy markets in various ways, both directly and indirectly. Directly, energy demand will be affected by extreme temperature changes, because higher temperatures imply less energy for heating and more demand for cooling, in addition to variations in the demand for energy as a production factor. The Advanced Energy Initiative-AEI proposes that the US must progress beyond a petroleum based economy and devise new methods such as ethanol to power automobiles. The main objective of this study is to determine the influence of climate on US ethanol energy demand using state level panel data from 1970 to 2014. The duality of cost minimization is utilized to examine the effects of climate on ethanol use in the commercial, transportation and industrial sectors using a Translog cost function. The first order conditions of cost function provide sectorial compensated demand for ethanol and substitution elasticity between sectors. A system of demand shares equations representing the sectors explained by prices, technology and climatic variables as exogenous variables is estimated. The commercial sector price is used to normalize the equations and hold the homogeneity and symmetry conditions. The estimated parameters are used to construct price elasticity and Hick-Allen elasticity of substitution for ethanol demand. Preliminary results indicate that improvement in technological efficiencies reduces ethanol use in the industrial while transportation shows an increase. The same results hold for precipitation.

Keynote Forum

Jack Brown

Professor University of Idaho, USA

Keynote: Designing oilseed feedstock crops for biofuels

Time : 11:10-12:00

OMICS International Agri Engineering 2017 International Conference Keynote Speaker Jack Brown photo
Biography:

Jack Brown has completed his PhD from St. Andrews University, Scotland, UK in 1988. He has worked in breeding barley, potato, wheat and for the past 26 years he has been running the Canola, Rapeseed and Mustard Breeding Program at the University of Idaho, USA. During his career, he has released 34 commercial cultivars, been major Advisor to 27 MS or PhD students and published 75 refereed journal articles.

Abstract:

High importation and environmental concerns of fossil based liquid fuels in the U.S. have focused attention on developing biofuels (i.e., biodiesel and hydrotreated renewable jet fuel). Brassicaceae oilseed crops have biofuel feedstock potential; however, different crops may have adaptation to different growing regions. We determined the potential of winter or spring canola and rapeseed (Brassica napus and B. rapa), Camelina (Camelina sativa), as well as spring Indian (B. juncea), Ethiopian (B. carinata), and yellow (Sinapis alba) and greatest potential was found from B. napus. However, to significantly reduce greenhouse gases or U.S. dependency on imported oils, then large genetic gains need to be achieved by breeding improved cultivars with modified oil characteristics and with higher value end-use products. Future advances in adaptability and resistance to abiotic and biotic stresses will be enhanced by developing improved breeding methodologies, including use of molecular markers for more efficient selection. The University of Idaho has been developing (non-food) biofuel oilseed cultivars for over 35 years. During this time we have significantly increased overall seed yield and oil yield and developed new novel oil types and seed meal traits that make these new cultivars more suitable for fuel production. More recently we have construct translational genomics platforms to improve the efficiency of rapeseed cultivar development using genome-wide association studies to identify genomic regions associated with important agronomic, morphological and oil quality traits. Past and future directions of the University of Idaho Breeding program for biofuel feedstock cultivar development will be presented.

Keynote Forum

Metin Turan

Professor Yeditepe University, Turkey

Keynote: Effects of humic acid applications on some plant yield, quality parameters and nutrient contents in Turkey

Time : 12:00-12:50

OMICS International Agri Engineering 2017 International Conference Keynote Speaker Metin Turan photo
Biography:

Metin Turan has completed his PhD from Ataturk University, Soil Science Department. He is currently working as a Full Professor at Yeditepe University, Genetics and Bioengineering Department. He has published more than 100 papers in reputed journals and has been serving as an Editorial Board Member of repute.

Abstract:

Humic acid (HA) might benefit plant growth by improving nutrient uptake, plant yield, fruit yield, plant physiological parameters. Humic acids have been complexed with sodium (Na), potassium (K), magnesium (Mg), zinc (Zn), calcium (Ca), iron (Fe), copper (Cu) and with various other elements to overcome a particular element deficiency in soil. Humic acid serves as a catalyst in promoting the activity of microorganisms in soil, so, some studies were conducted that effects of humic acid different plants in field and greenhouse conditions. In Wheat: The application doses of humic acid on wheat plants of iron uptake were the highest 8 L da-1. The regression analysis of the results for optimal application of humic acid doses was determined as 7.2 L da-1. In Spinach: Humic acid treatments increased antioxidant enzyme activity and physiological parameters of spinach plants, specially soil application of humic acid. And humic acid treatments increased dry matter, nutrient content and chlorophyll of spinach plants, specially leaf+soil application of humic acid. In Lettuce: Humic acid applications have positive effects on dry matter productivity and on nutrient mechanism of lettuce plant and with the increasing dose of humic acid; the usage of phosphorus by plants is increased. In Tomato: According to the study results the highest stem diameter, leaf number of branches, total plant yield and root weight were obtained from soil+foliar Ca-humate and B-humat application. While soil+foliar B-humate application increased to body diameter, number of branches and plant B content to 37%, 50%, and 84%, soil + foliar Ca-humat application increased to root weight, plant weight and plant Ca content to 62%, by 29%, and 70% when compared to control respectively. And the other study the humic acid treatment had positive effect on the dry matter yield and nutrition status of tomato plants. Whereas, it had not significant effect on the Fe contents of tomato leaves, statistically. In Broccoli: According to the study results, the highest plant root yield was determined from 1000 ppm humic acids with C26 bacteria applications, but the highest plant yield and chlorophyll contents were obtained from 2000 ppm humic acid with Osu-142 bacteria applications. The highest permeability was determined from 1000 ppm humic acid with Osu-142 bacteria applications.

  • Agricultural Biotechnology |Agriculture and Environment | Energy Conservation and Agriculture | Mechnized Agriculture | Agriculture Protection and Food Security | Agronomy and Soil Sciences | Seeding,TTillage and Harvesting | Food & Nutrients | Crop Protection and Awareness | Climatology and Atmospheric Sciences
Speaker

Chair

Jack Brown

University of Idaho, USA

Session Introduction

Robert Bowling

Texas A&M University, USA

Title: The sugarcane aphid (Hemiptera: Aphididae): an invasive pest of sorghum in North America

Time : 13:50-14:15

Speaker
Biography:

Robert Bowling has completed his PhD from Kansas State University and MS from Kansas State University Department of Entomology. He is the Assistant Professor of Texas A&M University, USA.

Abstract:

In 2013, the sugarcane aphid, Melanaphis sacchari (Zehntner) (Hemiptera: Aphididae), a new invasive pest of sorghum in North America, was confirmed on sorghum in 4 states and 38 counties in the United States. In 2016, it was reported on sorghum in 19 states and over 400 counties as well as all sorghum-production regions in Mexico. Ability to overwinter on living annual and perennial hosts in southern sorghum-producing areas and wind-aided movement by alate aphids appears to be main factors in its impressive geographic spread in North America. Morphological characteristics of the sugarcane aphid include dark tarsi, cornicles, and antennae, allowing easy differentiation from other aphids on the crop. Sugarcane aphid damages sorghum by removing sap and covering plants with honeydew, causing general plant decline and yield loss. Honeydew and sooty mold can disrupt harvesting. The aphid’s high reproductive rate on susceptible sorghum hybrids has resulted in reports of yield loss ranging from 10% to greater than 50%. In response, a combination of research-based data and field observations has supported development of state extension identification, scouting and treatment guides that aid in initiating insecticide applications to prevent yield losses. Highly efficacious insecticides have been identified and when complemented by weekly scouting and use of thresholds, economic loss by sugarcane aphid can be minimized. Some commercial sorghum hybrids are partially resistant to the aphid and plant breeders have identified other lines with sugarcane aphid resistance. A very diverse community of predators and parasitoids of sugarcane aphid has been identified and their value to limit sugarcane aphid population growth is under investigation.

Daniela Trifan

BRAICOOP Agricultural Cooperative, Romania Agricultural Research and Development Station of Braila, Romania

Title: Innovative technology to obtain vegetal biostimulants by biodegradation of agricultural post-harvest waste and medicinal plant extracts

Time : 14:15-14:40

Speaker
Biography:

Daniela Trifan has her expertise in agricultural and horticultural crops, and her passion is to improve the quality of crops by using the natural resources. She has completed her PhD in Plant Breeding, and was a Teacher in Agricultural Faculty. Currently, she is Research Scientist and Consultant for the farmers in an agricultural association with over 50 members. She was member in four national research projects and from 2016 she is Director of the researh project presented in this paper.  She has published more than 60 papers in reputed journals and reviewer and Editorial Board Member of more than 5 international journals.

Abstract:

The paper presents researches about construction of automated biodegradation platform for agricultural waste to obtain vegetal biostimulants and biofertilizers in two weeks. We have obtained two finished products: a liquid biostimulant for foliar application and a solid organic substrate for hydroponics or soil application to increase the fertility. The flow to obtain these products consists in the following steps: weighing and loading vegetal waste on the conveyor belt; chopping waste and loading in biodegradation platform by a cyclone; mixing the chopped crop residues with bioinoculum of lignolitical micro-organisms; homogenization and monitoring indices of aerobic biodegradation for 7 days; adding hot water and mixing to stop the aerobic biodegradation for 7 days, addition of herbal extracts with antibacterial and fungicidal effects; separating the liquid from the solid part by pressing of compost with their quality control; packaging and labeling organical substrate in bags; bottling and labeling the vegetal biostimulant; distribution. The higher content of nitrogen, potassium, and magnesium was recorded at the biostimulant obtained from sunflower waste, while the rich content of the phosphorus and sulfur was recorded at biostimulant obtained from wheat and barley waste. Variant obtained from mixed waste (sunflower, wheat, barley, corn) has the best balanced mineral content and it was tested in fields by the application of treatments with different doses, on agricultural crops (wheat, barley, rape, sunflower, corn and soybean) and on horticultural crops (apple, cherry, apricot, plum, raspberry), to determine the optimal dosages and their influence on the quality of agricultural and horticultural products.

Speaker
Biography:

Isameldin B Hashim has a PhD in Food Science from The University of Georgia, USA and MSc in Food Science from Alabama A&M University, USA. He is the Chair of Food Science Department at UAEU. He has published more than 50 papers in reputed scientific journals and presented in many national and international conferences, symposiums, seminars and workshops. His biography was published in Marquis Who'sWho in the World, 2011 (28th Edition), USA.

Abstract:

Date palm (Phoenix dactylifera L.) is the main fruit tree in the United Arab Emirates (UAE). Date fruit is consumed at different ripening stages. The aim of the study was to investigate the effect of date variety and ripening stage on sensory flavor profile and aromatic volatiles of Emirati date fruit. Six UAE date varieties (Barhi, Khalas, Ayashi, Nabtat Seif, Sakary M, and Sakary S) at three repining stages (besser, rutab and tamr) were studied. Dates quality varies according to the variety and ripening stage. For all the date varieties, glucose and fructose content increased with ripening and sucrose decreased except for Sakary S. Moisture content decreased with ripening. All the tested date varieties had similar sensory flavor profiles at the same ripening stage. 164 aromatic volatile compounds were identified mainly alcohols, esters, aldehydes and ketones. The type, number and evolution of the aromatic compounds differed depending on date variety and ripening stage. Results of the study provided the first comprehensive flavor profiles and aromatic volatiles of Emirati date fruits varieties.

Speaker
Biography:

Jean Marie Villmaor-Junaga is a Professor at the Department of Architecture at the University of the Philippines and is also a practicing Architect since 20 years. She has been actively attending international conferences on research related to housing, planning and material development. She has also made recent publications at the International Journal of Architecture and Urban Development (IJAUD) on vertical farming. Currently, she is more into researches related to material development of agricultural wastes in order to maximize potential use of waste while at the same time support waste valorization for a more sustainable and healthy environment.

Abstract:

This research explored the potential use biowaste cellulosic fibers as drywall panel board (DB) as construction material. The cellulosic fiber used in this study were primarily extracted from rice and banana crops agro-wastes which are highly cultivated in Philippines, other wastes used came from paper and carton boards. These biowaste products contribute to the environmental and climate change problems but can be mitigated by converting these wastes for productive reuse. In this experiment, the thermal conductivity (k value) and thermal resistivity (R-value) were determined. The materials tested were plaster of Paris as binder and perlite powder as fillers with respect to plaster/perlite/fiber ratio using percentage by weight, there were six (6) formulations used in the study, namely plaster of Paris (P-1), plaster of Paris and perlite (P-2), waste paper and rice straw (WR), waste paper and banana fiber (WB), rice straw and banana fiber (RB) and waste paper, rice straw and banana fiber (WRB). The R-following values were obtained for each formulation during testing: P-1 (0.36 h-ft2-°F/BTU), P-2 (0.49 h-ft2-°F/BTU), WR (0.83 h-ft2-°F/BTU), WB (0.67 h-ft2-°F/BTU), RB (0.88 h-ft2-°F/BTU), and WRB (0.68 h-ft2-°F/BTU). Moisture and water absorption were also determined. Among six (6) formulations, RB showed significant results having an R value of 0.88 h-ft2-°F/BTU when compared with commercially available drywall boards. The common drywall boards in the market have the following R-values: fiber-cement board (0.19 h-ft2-°F/BTU), hardboard (0.69 h-ft2-°F/BTU), ordinary plywood (0.62 h-ft2- °F/BTU), medium-density particle board (0.52 h-ft2-°F/BTU) and gypsum wallboard (0.45 h-ft2-°F/BTU). In theory, a higher R-value means that the material can lower the amount of heat gain inside the room. Hence, the material is energy efficient. Moreover, properties of the material such as acoustical capacity, fire resistivity and water absorption can be further explored.

 

  • Young Research Forum( YRF)
Speaker
Biography:

Mir Nurul Hasan Mahmud is currently a PhD student in School of Veterinary and Life Sciences, Murdoch University, 90 South Street, Murdoch, WA-6150, Australia. His PhD research project is titled evaluation of minimum tillage systems for rice-based rotations in Northwest Bangladesh: Effects on plough pan and water balance. He graduated from Bangladesh Agricultural University at Mymensing with a Bachelor of Science in Agricultural Engineering in 2004 and completed his Master of Science in Irrigation and Water Management from the same university in 2012. He is a Senior Scientific Officer of Irrigation and Water management Division at Bangladesh Rice Research Institute. He has published more than 15 papers in reputed journals.

Abstract:

Minimum tillage is proposed for saving water or increasing water productivity of crops. Here we compare the yield, irrigation water use and water productivity of wheat in strip planting (SP), bed planting (BP) and conventional tillage (CT). SP and BP were carried out using a versatile multi-crop planter mounted on a 2-wheel tractor. Residue treatments were 20% or 50% of rice straw retained. The study was carried out on long-term replicated plots at Rajshahi, Bangladesh (silty clay loam soil), which were established in 2010. The current experiment was conducted in cool dry seasons of 2015-2017. In 2015, the yield of wheat under SP (5.10 t ha-1) and BP (5.03 t ha-1) were significantly higher (P<0.05) than under CT (4.34 t ha-1). Over the three years, SP saved 11-33 % water compared to CT; while water input was 16-27 % lower in BP. Water productivity of wheat was higher in SP and BP compared to CT in three years. In 2015, water productivity of wheat was 2.06, 2.01 and 1.25 g grain kg-1 water for SP, BP and CT respectively. Similarly, water productivity of wheat in 2016 and 2017 was highest (2.32 and 1.95 g grain kg-1 water respectively) in SP. Water productivity of wheat in 2016 and 2017 was intermediate for BP between SP and CT. Minimum tillage approaches have the potential to increase production and water productivity in the northwest region of Bangladesh; however, the challenge will be to apply them in the annual crop rotations on smallholder-farms.

  • Poster Presentations
Speaker
Biography:

Joaquin Guillermo Ramirez Gil is an Agricultural Engineer, completed Master’s in Agricultural Sciences and currently pursuing his PhD. He has published more than 14 articles in scientific journals.

Abstract:

The avocado wilt complex (AWC) is the most important pathology of this crop. The interactions of this complex with its host are difficult to evaluate due that they occur inside the soil profile and are highly dependent on climatic variables such as precipitation and temperature. The climate variability may be a critical problem in Colombia, mainly associated with the occurrence of the Enso (Niña-Niño) phenomenon. The aim of this work was to determine the relationship between precipitation and temperature and avocado wilt complex under different scenarios associated with the Enso phenomenon. The incidence and severity of the AWC was evaluated during 36 months under field conditions. During this period, “La Niña” and “El Niño” occurred and climatic variables were quantified. The correlation analysis suggested that climatic variables did not have an immediate effect on AWC and could present a lag effect through time. Based in the observed results the interaction between precipitation and temperature and the response of AWC was evaluated by a multivariate analysis through time, using a system of simultaneous equations denominated vector error correction model (VECM), which allowed to identify the existence of lags in a variable as consequence of its own lag or associated with another variable. The results of this work indicate that “La Niña” and “El Niño” phenomena were highly related (P<0.05), where “La Niña” was associated with an increment in the incidence and severity and “El Niño” did not induce variation in the incidence values but increased the severity. Together our findings suggest that the Enso phenomenon affects avocado crops by increasing the incidence and severity of the AWM, therefore decreasing the sustainability of the productive system.

Speaker
Biography:

Joaquin Guillermo Ramirez Gil is an Agricultural Engineer, completed Master’s in Agricultural Sciences and currently pursuing his PhD. He has published more than 14 articles in scientific journals.

Abstract:

Ecological niches modeling (ENM) comprises an effort to environment requirements of species based on association with geographic occurrence to allow the potential distribution of the species in past, present and future. We developed an ENM for avocado (cv Hass) production fields in Colombia. The presence of avocado crops was related to environment information MODIS imagery and digital elevation model using maximum entropy modeling approaches. Model likelihood and information content were used in model selection and performance was evaluated in relation to independent geographic subsets of available occurrence data. Two models were selected that presents best performance and low omission of testing data. We were able to characterize the geographic distribution of commercial avocados crops in Colombia and to identify areas with potential for cultivation; we also found that this crop has been planted in areas apparently not suitable for it. ENM approaches offer a useful and novel tool for exploring and designing sustainable agriculture systems.